Homemade Chalkboard Wall

A while ago I posted a tutorial for making your own chalkboard paintChalkboard wallI finally got around to painting one of our dining room walls with the paint.   Unlike the table that I painted in my last post, I did not sand the wall after painting.  Well, I began to sand and then decided that it was a very, very bad idea.  The sanding took off too much paint.  So I touched up the wall and then skipped the sanding.

The great thing about making your own chalkboard paint is that you can make it whatever color you wish.   Our chalkboard wall is the same color as the rest of the living and dining room (except for the accent wall).  So if you were to visit our home you would not be able to tell that our wall was, in reality, a chalkboard unless we left the writing on it.

Having a whole wall as a chalkboard has been extremely useful:

  • We use our chalkboard wall for our family schedule, listing each activity by day.
  • I list the children’s school work or other responsibilities and they initial when they are done, so that if someone is playing outside I can look and immediately see if they have completed all their tasks for the day.
  • I list assignments that they must do at some point during the week, but not necessarily on a certain day, that way they have the responsibility for scheduling themselves and making sure they get everything done, but they do not have the excuse of “forgetting”.  (We do our poetry and nature journals this way.)
  • We let the little ones “color” on the bottom part of the wall, but we instruct that they must ONLY use the chalk. :)
  • We use the chalkboard for learning vocabulary words, diagramming sentences, math problems, illustrations, etc.
  • I have also used it to jot down a phone number, grocery or to do list.  Unlike a piece of paper, the wall doesn’t get lost or thrown away before it’s time.

Chalkboard wall 2I wondered in my last post about the chalkboard dust getting messy.  Since our chalkboard wall is in the dining room, the floor is swept a few times each day already, so the dust has been a non-issue.  Even if we weren’t sweeping so frequently I’m not sure that it would be problematic.  Unless you have small children drawing a lot the dust is minimal.

I was also concerned that it would be difficult to keep the wall clean.  Most of the time we simply wipe the chalk off with a dry cloth.  If it needs more than that, a quick wipe with a damp cloth has done the trick.  So neither of my concerns have been realized.

One caution:  I have found that our blue chalk tends to leave a blue residue unless removed with a damp cloth.  So we have been sticking with more neutral colors.

Chalkboard and magnetic wall

Here is our chalkboard wall shown with our contrast wall and it’s display of children’s art.  This picture is included merely to tempt you to come back next week and read about my ingenious idea to artfully display our children’s art work without clogging up the fridge.  Come on, with 9 children do you really think that I have enough space on the fridge for all of their masterpieces?  I love, love, love this idea and love how beautiful the children’s work looks displayed on our wall in this fashion.  Are you tempted?

Having a whole wall to use as a chalkboard works for me.  You can read some of my other WFMW posts or head on over to We Are THAT Family for loads of other fun ideas.

Want to know more about homeschooling?  You may be interested in reading my series on  Why We Homeschool or stick around to read about how we homeschool 9 children, how we set up and organize our home for year round education and  lots of curriculum  and educational product reviews that I have planned for the up coming year.

Share on Facebook75Pin on Pinterest65Email this to someoneTweet about this on Twitter0

38 Responses to Homemade Chalkboard Wall
  1. Smockity Frocks
    June 16, 2009 | 11:30 pm

    It looks GREAT! I have been wanting to do this for a long time. Can’t wait to give it a try!

    [Reply]

  2. Erin
    June 16, 2009 | 11:40 pm

    This is a great idea. The wall in my school room is brick, so it probably wouldn’t work, but I’m sure I will come up with a way to use this idea eventually.

    ~Erin

    [Reply]

  3. tara
    June 17, 2009 | 12:09 am

    Such a good idea!!! I may need to try this. And I am even more excited to hear about the art wall!!!
    PS. Did you know you have won the giveaway on my blog???

    [Reply]

  4. Home School Dad
    June 17, 2009 | 12:33 am

    What a fabulous idea. We were planning on waiting until next summer to repaint the walls as our daughter but be done writing on them by then. Now we may do it sooner so we can use the chalkboard when school starts back up again

    [Reply]

  5. It Feels Like Chaos
    June 17, 2009 | 12:33 am

    So cool! I have been wanting to try a chalkboard wall

    [Reply]

  6. Heather
    June 17, 2009 | 10:09 am

    Just curious as to how you avoid getting chalk drawings on all the rest of your walls?

    [Reply]

  7. Nikki
    June 17, 2009 | 10:33 am

    My sister and I were talking on the phone last night about a chalkboard wall or at least a segment of the wall painted with chalkboard paint. I love chalk much better than dry erase boards and markers. Chalk is easier to clean up and doesn’t leave ghostly writings as much after being erased.

    [Reply]

  8. Kirsty
    June 17, 2009 | 11:21 am

    I am intrigued. I will be coming back to see your next great idea! Thanks!

    [Reply]

  9. Smockity Frocks
    June 17, 2009 | 12:31 pm

    Kimberly, How do you display the art? Is it a corkboard wall?

    [Reply]

  10. Dawn
    June 17, 2009 | 1:05 pm

    Your room looks fabulous! I love this idea and can’t wait to read about how you display the artwork.

    [Reply]

  11. hi-d
    June 17, 2009 | 1:09 pm

    I love having the whole wall to write on! I always run out of room on my chalk board… so next time I paint the dinning room/class room… I’m doing a whole wall chalk board too! Thanks for sharing!
    Looking forward to your other “wall” post! :-)

    [Reply]

  12. niki
    June 17, 2009 | 2:51 pm

    I love it! I am always seeing so many people using that cool paint for a variety of projects but a whole wall is just awe-inspiring!

    :)

    [Reply]

  13. Raising Olives
    June 17, 2009 | 4:20 pm

    Heather,
    I keep the children from using chalk on the other walls by controlling the chalk. They may use the chalk with permission, but it is a treat and not available whenever they wish.
    Also, chalk is easy to remove, so when it happens and I’m relatively sure that it will, it won’t be as disastrous as if we were using a dry-erase board. :)

    Smockity,
    No it’s not cork board and you will simply have to come back next Wednesday to see how I display the art in my marvelous dining room. :D

    Blessings,
    Kimberly

    [Reply]

  14. Scott Somerville
    June 17, 2009 | 5:41 pm

    That’s cool enough to tweet about!

    [Reply]

  15. Mary @ Giving Up on Perfect
    June 19, 2009 | 12:12 pm

    I LOVE this idea!! Our walls are a weird, textured material . . . but if we ever move to a different house, I hope to have a chalkboard of some kind in my daughter’s room. But your idea – the whole wall and in the family area – is so smart. I love it!!

    (I came over from WFMW.)

    [Reply]

  16. Michelle
    June 20, 2009 | 7:23 pm

    I’ve been wanting to do a chalk board wall for the longest time but the cost of the paint kept stopping me. Now I have no excuse!

    [Reply]

  17. AZ
    July 17, 2009 | 1:04 am

    Very cool!

    [Reply]

  18. Jennifer
    July 26, 2009 | 10:54 pm

    WOW!! This is such a great idea! I rent, so I really can’t do it…but I wish I could! I try to use the whiteboards you can buy in the stores, but they’re never big enough! Thanks for sharing this!!

    [Reply]

    Arlene Reply:

    A great alternative is to buy a nice piece of board at a home improvement store and paint it with the chalkboard paint. You can hang it or lean it on the wall.

    [Reply]

    Svetlana Reply:

    I did that…I bought a very thin piece of wood can’t remember the name exactly and I got primer and bought the chalkboard paint and painted it. Look awesome…BUT…once i started to write on it and i tried to erase it the eraser didn’t work so every time i need to erase something i use warm water and vinegar and even w/ that it leaves streaks ughh I’m so upset…I don’t know what else to use. Do i need a special “eraser”?? Someone please help!

    [Reply]

    Arlene Reply:

    I did my daughters large sliding closet door. The directions of the chalk board paint was to use the side of a piece of chalk to make large lines and cover the entire surface then erase. Then the board will be ready to write on. Do you want the wall to always be the dark color you started with before you used chalk? Remember you’ve created a chalkboard it will always have the powdery look. I hope this helped.

    [Reply]

  19. Sharon
    August 13, 2009 | 1:47 am

    I love your website! I have a question about the amount of grout to use per gallon of paint. Thank you for all you do! I have four children and I will be homeschooling the 7 year old my oldest. I am scared and excited!

    [Reply]

    Raising Olives Reply:

    Sharon,

    There would be 2 cups of unsanded grout per gallon of paint. However a gallon of chalkboard paint goes will go a very long way. :)

    Blessings as you begin your homeschool journey. We love, love, love homeschooling and are so blessed that this is the path the Lord led us on.

    [Reply]

    Amber Henderson Reply:

    Could I paint a portion of the wall with the chalkboard wall color mix and it not stand out aganist the other portion that isn’t painted? Or does that section have a noticeable texture that might clash with the rest of the wall?

    [Reply]

  20. Debby
    February 3, 2010 | 2:29 pm

    Did you sand your wall before applying the chalkboard paint?

    [Reply]

    Kimberly @ Raising Olives Reply:

    No I didn’t sand the wall first. However, I think that would be a good thing to do. There is a natural texture simply from where the previous pain has been applied.

    [Reply]

  21. Monica
    February 22, 2010 | 5:52 pm

    I stumbled across your blog from Leah Killian’s blog (lifeaslou.blogsome.com). My husband is just about finished making our craft table and I would like the top to be a chalkboard. We will use this table to preschool, scrapbooking, painting, etc. Is the texture rough & gritty? Will it be beneficial to sand it down? Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Kimberly @ Raising Olives Reply:

    I would suggest that you try painting the table with regular paint first and seeing how chalk works on it. I have a friend who writes on her walls all the time and she hasn’t used the chalkboard paint. :)

    The texture is a little gritty and it is more difficult to clean.

    If you try using chalk on your table w/o the chalkboard paint, I’d love to know how it works out for you!

    [Reply]

  22. [...] Be sure to come back next week for a tour of our kitchen and dining room.  Psst, that’s where we have our art displaying magnetic wall and our chalkboard wall. [...]

  23. Arlene
    September 7, 2010 | 9:08 am

    My daughter has large sliding closet doors in her bedroom. I painted one with chalkboard paint and the other with magnetic paint. First I painted a light green boarder around the doors then taped them off and painted the doors with chalkboard and magnetic paint. I did it about 4 years ago and she still uses them much as when I first did it. Super easy and great project.

    [Reply]

  24. Chris
    April 5, 2011 | 9:14 am

    Kimberly, we painted a wall like this in our dining room which doubles as our school area. I think I followed your directions but the chalk will not erase very well at all. We did use a darker color (brick red)of paint. Do you think this would make a difference? Any other ideas? What kind of paint did you use to begin with? We used flat wall paint.

    [Reply]

    Kimberly @ Raising Olives Reply:

    Hi Chris,

    I don’t think the darker color would effect it. We’ve found that the best thing to use for removing the chalk is a terrycloth washrag. The texture of the cloth helps remove the chalk. Also we periodically use a wet cloth to remove the chalk residue.

    Another factor maybe the smoothness (or lack of smoothness) of the wall before you painted.

    We’ve found that sidewalk chalk erases more easily than standard chalk (but we avoid the bright colors).

    We used a semi-gloss base paint.

    I hope this helps and you can get it to work for you. We still love ours and find it very useful.

    [Reply]

    Kimberly @ Raising Olives Reply:

    On second thought maybe the darker color would affect, not that doesn’t erase as well, but just that you can more easily see every little bit of chalk dust that didn’t come off. ??

    [Reply]

  25. Holly
    February 1, 2012 | 5:39 pm

    I saw your magnetic wall and your chalkboard wall. I was wondering if it would be posssible to combine the two into one. To take the magnetic paint first and apply that as a base coat of paint and then to go over that with the chalkboard paint to give you a magnetic chalkboard wall. I understand that I may need to do multiple coats for coverage. Has anyone tried this or am I the first to think of this?

    [Reply]

    Kimberly @ Raising Olives Reply:

    I know other people have asked that question, but am not sure if anyone has tried it.

    [Reply]

  26. Holly
    February 25, 2012 | 5:27 pm

    I have been struggling with doing a whole wall this way and have been so frustrated. As I paint the first part of the wall looks great but as I go on, the pain starts to get gritty and leaves a stucco-like look on the wall. Do you know what I’m talking about? and how did you avoid it?

    [Reply]

    Kimberly @ Raising Olives Reply:

    I mixed small amounts of paint at a time and stirred frequently.

    Hope things work out for you.

    [Reply]

  27. lisa
    August 28, 2013 | 1:31 pm

    this would work great in the house we are living in since it is a rental but im a little stupid t is tablespoon or teaspoon?

    [Reply]

Leave a Reply

Trackback URL http://raisingolives.com/2009/06/homemade-chalkboard-wall/trackback/